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vent-plumbing




Every building you see has little vent-plumbing pipes sticking out of the roof all over it. There are vent exhaust pipes for chimneys, toilets and sinks, or any plumbing that requires a vent for proper drainage.




Plumbing installation vents have to be installed before the shingles, insulation, and drywall because they have to go through the roof and all these things have to be installed around the vent pipes.

The plumbing installation vents can be "cut through" the shingles, but that would be a real pain for the sub who has to install the vents. Consequently, if the vents are installed after the shingles, it would cost you much more.




In order for your drain-waste-vent (sewer line) to flow freely, it is necessary for all your sinks, showers and tubs to have vent lines to exhaust sewer gasses and provide necessary air pressure for good sewage drainage.

All your drain lines collect water from any water source; sinks, showers, etc., and they slope gradually downward allowing gravity to facilitate their drainage.

All the vent pipes are from 1¼ inches to 4 inches in diameter to avoid possible blockages. (toilets use a 4-inch pipe, sinks, lavatories, showers. bathtubs, and laundry tubs usually have 2-inch pipe drain.)

Each drain must be served by a vent line that carries sewer gasses out through the roof in order to operate properly.



Sometimes plumbers have to clean-out drains and so all drains/vents need clean-outs in locations that are easy to access. A clean-out is simply a capped off Y-shaped fitting in the line. A plumber can use these clean-outs to snake out the line if and when it becomes necessary.

In 16 years living in a previous home, we never needed our clean-out, and then one day “it” happened, and that clean out was necessary. I won't tell you about it, other than we were glad for the clean-out; not happy to have to clean it out, but.... sometimes it is necessary.

TRAPS



All vent-plumbing drains have to have traps, either P Traps or S traps. A trap is a curved section of pipe that is able to fill up with water to prevent sewer gasses and odors from coming into the house because of the water seal in the trap.



P traps penetrate a wall, and S Traps go through the floor. Each time you use the sink or tub, etc. the trap water drains and is replaced, continuing the seal.

You do need to make sure your traps are placed where they are insulated from extreme weather. We had an experience in this house that the P Trap froze. SEE this link: Scroll down to "Kick-outs" and Insulation


In a previous home,we had a drain in the basement once that wasn't used for long periods of time, and gasses would start coming up because of evaporation. We had to pour water down the drain periodically to keep the vent-plumbing trap sealed.

If you have a tub, sink or shower and drain in the basement that is rarely used, be sure you pour water down the drain from time to time to keep that seal and prevent sewer smells from entering your home.

House plumbing installation is an important part of building your new home. It can be done as a DIY project but a professional plumber will "knock it out" quickly and efficiently and you'll know it's done right.






Building your home as owner/contractor


vent-plumbing
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