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drywall-preparation


Wallboard has to have certain drywall-preparation before the drywall mud can be applied. It takes a bit of drywall setup and preparation before your house will begin to look like it is truly going to be a home.



In building our owner/builder home, our wallboard contractor was exceptionally fast and his crew finished up in record time.

When the drywall is put up, the house is starting to look like a home, and you begin to get the feeling that it is finally coming together. I call it the “feel good” stage of the building process.



The following picture is dark, for which I'm sorry. It does show some of the mud piled in the middle of our family room. Remember that nearly half of the mud has already been used throughout the house.

Over a Ton of Mud

drywall mud It took over 1 Ton of mud for our entire house. You can see some of it sitting in the middle of the room in boxes.

When the drywall man brought it all in, he said "This represents over a ton of mud, so keep this house warm. You don't want to lose that much mud."

It was in the middle of the winter and freezing every night, so our furnace had to be kept on 'full speed' to keep the mud warm.Our daughter had a generator and a 'roll around' heat unit that they used to keep their mud warm as they built their home.



That would be a better plan because the room you stack the mud in could be kept warm and not the entire house. But therein comes another problem, when mudding your home in the winter: the air is cold and unless you heat the home in the winter, you'll have difficulty keeping a contractor working for you.

In fact, I know an electrician who flat out quit wiring a home near here, because his fingers were freezing and he had a tough time hanging on to the wires.

Once the wallboard is all installed, then the "tape and mud" expert slaps mud and tape on all the joints where the drywall edges meet, and on the inside and outside corners.

My husband (RL) used to put up wallboard, tape and mud when he'd fix up a child's room, and it was not easy doing the drywall-preparation making the wall ready for painting. There are "tricks to the trade" so you don't have to sand every joint


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